CAMBODIAN Facts & Figures

Size: 69,898 square miles

Population: 14,805,358

Capital: Phnom Penh

Currency: Riel, United States Dollar

Weather / Climate:

Cambodia's climate, like that of the rest of Southeast Asia, is dominated by monsoons, which are known as tropical wet and dry because of the distinctly marked seasonal differences.

Cambodiahas a temperature range from 21 to 35 °C (69.8 to 95 °F) and experiences tropical monsoons. Southwest monsoons blow inland bringing moisture-laden winds from the Gulf of Thailand and Indian Ocean from May to October. The northeast monsoon ushers in the dry season, which lasts from November to March. The country experiences the heaviest precipitation from September to October with the driest period occurring from January to February.

Cambodiahas two distinct seasons. The rainy season, which runs from May to October, can see temperatures drop to 22 °C (71.6 °F) and is generally accompanied with high humidity. The dry season lasts from November to April when temperatures can rise up to 40 °C (104 °F) around April. Disastrous flooding occurred in 2001 and again in 2002, with some degree of flooding almost every year.

Taken from wikipedia

www.wikipedia.com

CAMBODIAN languages

Khmeror Cambodian, is the language of the Khmer people and the official language of Cambodia. It is the second most widely spoken Austroasiatic language (after Vietnamese), with speakers in the tens of millions. Khmer has been considerably influenced by Sanskrit and Pali, especially in the royal and religious registers, through the vehicles of Hinduism and Buddhism. It is also the earliest recorded and earliest written language of the Mon–Khmer family, predating Mon and by a significant margin Vietnamese.[2] The Khmer language has influenced, and also been influenced by, Thai, Lao, Vietnamese and Cham, all of which, due to geographical proximity and long-term cultural contact, form a sprachbund in peninsular Southeast Asia.[3]

The Khmer language is written with an abugida known in Khmer as âksâr khmêr. Khmer differs from neighboring languages such as Thai, Lao and Vietnamese in that it is not a tonal language.

The main dialects, all mutually intelligible, are:

Battambang, spoken in northern Cambodia.

Phnom Penh, the capital dialect and is also spoken in surrounding provinces.

Northern Khmer, also known as Khmer Surin, spoken by ethnic Khmer native to Northeast Thailand

Khmer Kromor Southern Khmer, spoken by the indigenous Khmer population of the Mekong Delta.

Cardamom Khmer, an archaic form spoken by a small population in the Cardamom Mountains of western Cambodia and eastern Central Thailand[4][5]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khmer_language

CAMBODIAN culture

Little is known of the early history of Cambodia, although there is evidence of habitation in parts of the country as far back as 4000BC. It is also known that Chinese and Indian traders exchanged goods with people living on the coasts of present-day Cambodia and Vietnam in the early AD centuries. According to Chinese chroniclers, a kingdom known as 'Funan' flourished between AD300–600. A dynasty founded by the prince Jayavarman – possibly descended from the rulers of Funan – ruled from settlements in the eastern part of the country between around AD790 and the 11th century. Cambodian power spread westwards during this period into parts of Thailand.

The golden era of the Khmer dynasty, from the 9th to the 15th centuries, made the kingdom of Kambuja (from where modern-day Cambodia gets its name) one of the most powerful in Asia. A long period of decline followed, before the country fell under French colonial clutches in the 1800s. Independence was finally achieved in 1953, after which Norodom Sihanouk was appointed king. His first reign lasted until the 1970s.

The fate of Cambodia shocked the world when the radical communist Khmer Rouge under their leader Pol Pot seized power in 1975 after years of guerrilla warfare. An estimated 1.7 million Cambodians died during the next three years, many from exhaustion or starvation. Others were tortured and executed.

Today, Cambodia is one of the poorest countries in the world and relies heavily on aid. Foreign donors have urged the government to clamp down on pervasive corruption. Cambodia is burdened with the legacy of decades of conflict; unexploded munitions - thought to number in the millions - continue to kill and maim civilians, despite an ongoing de-mining drive.

Only now is the country beginning to put the mechanism in place to bring those responsible for the "killing fields" to justice. Cambodia and the UN have agreed to set up a tribunal to try the surviving leaders of the genocide years. The tribunal held its first public hearing - a bail request by one of the defendants - in November 2007. The first trial - of former prison warder Kaing Guek Eav, or Comrade Duch - started in 2009 and reached a guilty verdict in July 2010.

In pursuit of a rural utopia, the Khmer Rouge abolished money and private property and ordered city dwellers into the countryside to cultivate the fields. The effects can still be seen today, with around 70% of Cambodia's workforce employed in subsistence farming. The Mekong River provides fertile, irrigated fields for rice production. Exports of clothing generate most of Cambodia's foreign exchange and tourism is also important. The imposing temple complex at Angkor, built between the ninth and 13th centuries by Khmer kings, is a UN heritage site and a big draw for visitors.

Well over half of Cambodia is forested, but illegal logging is robbing the country of millions of dollars of badly-needed revenue. International watchdog Global Witness claims top officials are involved in the trade. The environment is also suffering, with topsoil erosion and flooding becoming prevalent. The spread of HIV/Aids is another threat; however, public health campaigns have reduced the rate of infection.

Beloved by backpackers and boasting some of the most awe-inspiring historical remains on the planet, Cambodia is a kingdom of wild jungle, steamy cities and a past that's equal parts inspiring and saddening. The striking magnificence of the Angkor Temples has long been the main draw for budget and luxury travellers alike, but there's far more to the country than its ancient Khmer heritage. In Cambodia's capital city, Phnom Penh, find one of the region's most absorbing cities - a laconic waterside feel offset by rampant nightlife and a proud local culture - while elsewhere, national parks, beaches and lashings of tropical adventure all help keep visitor numbers healthy. The nation was brought to its knees under Pol Pot's destructive Khmer Rouge regime in the 1970s - this recent history providing chilling attractions of its own - but has recovered sufficiently to become one of the highlights of Southeast Asia.

95% of the population is Buddhist (Theravada), the remainder Muslim and Christian. Buddhism was reinstated as the national religion in 1989 after a ban on religious activity in 1975. Sensitivity to politically-related subjects in conversation is advisable. Avoid pointing your foot at a person or touching someone on the head. Women should keep their shoulders covered and not wear shorts when visiting pagodas. Photography is permitted, with certain restrictions such as the photography of military installations, airports and railway stations. It is considered polite to ask permission before photographing Cambodian people, especially monks.

 

Holidays

·         01 January – New Year's Day

·         07 January – Victory Day

·         19 January – Meak Bochea Day

·         08 March – Women’s Day

·         14 April – Cambodian New Year

·         April – Visaka Buja Day, Birth of Buddha

·         01 May – Labour Day

·         02 May – Royal Ploughing Day Ceremony

·         15 May – King Sihamoni’s Birthday

·         18 June – Former Queen’s Birthday

·         24 September – Constitution Day

·         26 September – Pchum Ben Day

·         29 October – Coronation Day

·         31 October – Former King Sihanouk’s Birthday

·         09 November – Independence Day

·         10 November – Water Festival

·         10 December – Human Rights Day

Taken from:

www.bbc.co.uk

www.worldtravelguide.net

CAMBODIAN people

As of 2010, Cambodia has an estimated population of 14,805,358 people. Ninety percent of Cambodia's population is of Khmer origin and speak the Khmer language, the country's official language. Cambodia's population is relatively homogeneous. Its minority groups include Vietnamese (2,800,000), Chinese (1,180,000), Cham (317,000), and Khmer Loeu (550,000).[63] The country's birth rate is 25.4 per 1,000. Its population growth rate is 1.70%, significantly higher than those of Thailand, South Korea, and India.[64]

The Khmer language is a member of the Mon–Khmer subfamily of the Austroasiatic language group. French, once the language of government in Indochina, is still spoken by many older Cambodians. French is also the language of instruction in some schools and universities that are funded by the government of France. Cambodian French, a remnant of the country's colonial past, is a dialect found in Cambodia and is sometimes used in government, particularly in court.[65]

In recent decades, many younger Cambodians and those in the business-class have favoured learning English. In the major cities and tourist centers, English is widely spoken and taught at a large number of schools because of the overwhelming number of tourists from English-speaking countries. Even in the most rural outposts, most young people speak at least some English, as it is often taught by monks at the local pagodas where many children are educated.

The civil war and its aftermath have markedly affected the Cambodian population; 50% of the population is younger than 22 years old. At a 1.04 female to male ratio, Cambodia has the most female-biased sex ratio in the Greater Mekong Subregion.[66] In the Cambodian population over 65, the female to male ratio is 1.6:1.[57]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambodia#Demographics

CAMBODIAN food

The food of Cambodia includes tropical fruits, rice, noodles, drinks, dessert and various soups.

The staple food for Cambodians is rice. Almost every meal includes a bowl of rice, although noodles are also popular. A wide range of curries, soups and stir fries are served with rice. Many rice varieties are available in Cambodia, including aromatic rice and glutinous or sticky rice. The latter is more commonly found in desserts with fruits like durian.

Khmer Cuisine shares much in common with the food of neighbouring Thailand, although it is generally not as spicy; and Vietnam, with whom it shares and adopts many common dishes and a colonial history, both being part of the French colonial empire in Southeast Asia. It has also drawn upon influences from the cuisines of China and France, both of whom are powerful players in Cambodian history. Curry dishes, known as kari (in Khmer, ????) show a trace of cultural influence from India. The many variations of rice noodles show the influences from Chinese cuisine. Preserved lemons are another unusual ingredient not commonly found in the cooking of Cambodia's neighbours, which is used in some Khmer dishes. Coconut milk is the main ingredient of many Khmer curries and desserts.

A legacy of the French is the baguette, which the Cambodians often eat with pâté, tinned sardines or eggs. One of these with a cup of strong coffee, sweetened with condensed milk, is an example of a common Cambodian breakfast.

Typically, Cambodians eat their meals with at least three or four separate dishes. A meal will usually include a soup, or samlor, served alongside the main courses. Each individual dish will be either sweet, sour, salty or bitter. Chili is served on the side, and left up to individual diners and to their taste. In this way Cambodians ensure that they get a bit of every flavor to satisfy their palates.

Several cooking courses are now run in popular tourist areas, giving visitors the chance to share the culinary secret of the Khmers.

Ingredients

Prahok

A common ingredient, almost a national institution, is a pungent type of fermentedfish paste used in many dishes, a distinctive flavoring known as prahok . It's an acquired taste for most Westerners, but is an integral part of Khmer cuisine and is included in many dishes or used as a dipping sauce. The liberal use of prahok, which adds a salty tang to many dishes, is a characteristic which distinguishes Khmer cuisine from that of its neighbours. Prahok can be prepared many ways and eaten as a dish on its own right. Prahok jien is fried and usually mixed with meat (usually beef or pork) and chilli. It can also be eaten with dips, vegetables like cucumbers or eggplants, and rice. Prahok gop or Prahok is covered with banana leaves and left to cook under a fire under pieces of rock or over the coals.

When prahok is not used, kap? , a kind of fermented shrimp paste is used instead. Khmer cuisine also uses fish sauce widely in soups and stir-fried dishes, and as a dipping sauce.

Spices

The Cambodian herb and spice base paste Kroeung.

Unknown in Asia prior to the 16th century, the chili pepper arrived with the Portuguese. More years still passed before the chili pepper reached Cambodia, and to this day it lacks a certain status in Khmer cooking and is not extensively used, unlike neighbouring Thailand, Laos or Malaysia. Black pepper is the preferred choice when heat is required in a dish. Tamarind is commonly employed as a soup base for dishes such as samlar machu. Star anise is a must when caramelizing meat in palm sugar like pork in the dish known as pak lov. Turmeric, galangal, ginger, lemongrass and kaffir lime leaves are essential spices in Khmer cooking, Khmer stews, and nearly all curries.[1]

As the country has an extensive network of waterways, freshwater fish plays a large part in the diet of most Cambodians, making its way into many recipes. Daily fresh catches come from the Mekong River, Bassac River and the vast Tonlé Sap. While freshwater fish is the most commonly-used meat in the Cambodian diet, pork and chicken are also popular. Though not as common as in neighboring Vietnam, vegetarian food is still a part of Khmer cuisine and often favored by more observant Buddhists.

Kroeung

From India, by way of Java, Cambodians have been taught the art of blending spices into a paste using many ingredients like cardamom, star anise, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and turmeric. Other native ingredients like lemongrass, galangal, garlic, shallots, cilantro, and kaffir lime leaves are added to this mix to make a distinctive and complex spice blend called "kroeung." Other ingredients for kroeung used by Khmers in America are lemongrass, turmeric powder, garlic, prahok, and lemon leaf. This is an important aromatic paste commonly used in Cambodian cooking.

Vegetables

Many vegetables used in Khmer cuisine are also used in Chinese cuisine. Unusual vegetables such as winter melon, bitter melon, luffa, and yardlong beans can be found in soups and stews. Oriental squash can be stewed, stir fried or sweetened and steamed with coconut milk as a dessert. Vegetables like mushrooms, cabbage, baby corn, bamboo shoots, fresh ginger, Chinese broccoli, snow peas, and bok choy are commonly used in many different stir fry dishes. Together these are known by the generic term chha . Banana blossoms are sliced and added to some noodle dishes like nom banh chok.

Fruits

Fruits in Cambodia are so popular that they have their own royal court. The durian is considered the "king," the mangosteen the "queen," sapodilla the "prince" and the milk fruit (phlai teuk doh ko) the "princess." Other popular fruits include: the jan fruit, kuy fruit, romduol, pineapple, star apple, rose apple, coconut, palmyra fruit, jackfruit, papaya, watermelon, banana, mango and rambutans. Although fruits are usually considered desserts, some fruits such as ripe mangoes, watermelon, and pineapples are eaten commonly with heavily salted fish with plain rice. Fruits are also made into beverages called tuk kolok mostly shakes. Popular fruits for shakes are durian, mangoes, bananas.

Meat

Fish is the most common form of meat in Khmer cuisine. Dried salted fish known as trei ngeat are a favourite with plain rice porridge. The popular Khmer dish called amok uses a kind of catfish steamed in a savoury coconut-based curry. Pork is quite popular in making sweet Khmer sausages known as twah ko. Beef and chicken are stewed, grilled or stir fried. Seafood includes an array of shellfish like clams, cockles, crayfish, shrimp and squid. Lobsters are not commonly eaten because of their price, but middle class and rich Cambodians enjoy eating them at Sihanoukville. Duck roasted in Chinese char siu style is popular during festivals. More unusual varieties of meat include frog, turtle, and various arthropods like tarantulas; these would be difficult to find in Khmer cuisine abroad, but are used in everyday dishes in Cambodia.

Noodles

While many elements of Cambodian noodle dishes were inspired by Chinese and Vietnamese cooking, a strictly Khmer noodle is noum prajok. Noum prajok is a distinct thin round rice noodle served with fresh vegetables and a choice of Khmer curry (red) or somla brahay (green soup with the main ingredient being fish, lemon grass, prahok, galanga, tumeric, garlic). (source is wong/inaccurate) Rice stick noodles are used in Mee Katang, which is a Cambodian variation of ch?o f?n with gravy. Unlike the Chinese styled ch?o f?n, the noodles are plated under the stir fry beef and vegetables and topped off with scrambled eggs. Burmese style noodles (Mee Kola) is a vegetarian dish made from thin rice stick noodles, steamed and cooked with soy sauce and garlic chives. This is served with pickled vegetables Jroak julienned eggs, and sweet garlic fish sauce garnished with crushed peanuts. Mi Cha is stir fried egg noodles.

Popular dishes

  • Amok trey- Fish covered with kroeung and coconut milk, wrapped in banana leaves and steamed.
  • Ansom chek- A cylindrical rice cake wrapped in banana leaves and filled with bananas (sweet). There is also a savoury version filled with pork and mung bean paste called ansom chrook .
  • Babar- A type of congee or rice porridge, plain or usually with chicken or pork served with fresh bean sprouts and green onions. (Babar Praey - salted Congee)
  • Bai cha- A Khmer variation of fried rice which includes Chinese sausages, garlic, soy sauce, and herbs, usually eaten with pork.
  • Banh chiao- The Khmer version of the Vietnamese dish bánh xèo.

  • Ban hoaw- Steamed rice vermicelli noodles with mint, crushed peanuts, pickled vegetables, and deep fried egg rolls, cut into bite sized pieces, lathered in sweet fish sauce.
  • Bok L'hong- Khmer green papaya salad, pounded in a mortar and pestle. Related to Laotian Tam mak hoong, the salad may include the herb kantrop, asian basil, string beans, roasted peanuts, cherry tomatoes, salted preserved small crabs, smoked or dried fish, and chili peppers. Mixed with a savory dressing of lime juice, fish sauce and/or prahok.
  • Caw- A braised pork or chicken and egg stew flavored in caramelized palm sugar. It may contain tofu or bamboo shoots. A typical Khmer Krom dish, who are ethnic Khmer indigenous to southern Vietnam, this dish is similar to the Vietnamese dish of Th?t Kho and the Filipino dish called Humba.
  • Cha knyey- A spicy dish of meat stir fried with julienne ginger root, black pepper, and fresh jalapeños or fresh peppers.
  • Jroak sway- Unripe julienned mango salad flavored with fish sauce and peppers. Usually served as a side dish with fried or baked fish and rice.
  • Ka tieu  - This traditional pork broth based noodle soup dish is a popular dish in Cambodia. It is served with the garnishes of fresh bean sprouts, chopped green onions and cilantro.
  • Kralan- A cake made from steamed rice mixed with beans or peas, grated coconut and coconut milk.
  • Loc Lac- Stir fried cubed beef served with fresh red onions, served on a bed of lettuce, cucumbers, and tomatoes and dipped in a sauce consisting of lime juiceand/or black pepper. It is the Cambodian version of the Vietnamese Bò lúc l?c.
  • Lou- Cambodian thick short noodles, with added eggs and chicken, eaten mainly with fish sauce.
  • Mee Katang- Wide rice noodles in an oyster sauce typically stir fried with eggs, baby corn, carrots, Chinese broccoli, mushrooms and a choice of meat, usually beef. This dish is similar to the Thai dish Rad Na.
  • Mee M'poang- crispy yellow noodles served under a gravy sauce of eggs, carrots, Chinese broccoli, bok choy and a meat.
  • Ngam nguv- A chicken soup flavored with whole preserved lemons.
  • Num Yip- yellow star like dessert made of egg yolk, flour, and sugar.
  • Pleah- Partially cooked beef salad with beef tripe, flavored with prahok and tossed with onions and fresh herbs.
  • Samlor kari- A traditional spicy coconut chicken curry with a soupy consistency, often cooked with sweet potatoes, juliennedonion, and bamboo shoot. The soup is also used as a dipping sauce for fresh baguettes.
  • Samlor machu- A popular sour soup with a tamarind base. Includes meat such as chicken or fish, tomatoes, lotus roots, water greens, herbs and may be flavored with prahok. It is derived from the Vietnamese sour soup canh chua.
  • Sankya Lapov  - A dessert made of pumpkin and coconut flan.
  • Yaohonor yaohon - A Khmer-style hot pot for dipping beef, shrimp, spinach, dill, napa cabbage, rice noodles and mushrooms. It is similar to the Japanese sukiyaki, however, it is derived from Chinese hot pot.
  • Num Ppang Chen(literally Chinese Bread): Spring onion bread often referred as Chinese pizza. It combines Chineses and French styles foods. It is flat and bake and fry simultaneously rather than simply being fry like its Chinese counterpart.

Taken from wikipedia

Places to go in CAMBODIA

Visitors to Cambodia have a tendency to leave with bulkier luggage than on arrival: the country's markets are heavy with potential souvenirs, ranging from silks, textiles and statues to carvings, silverwork and Buddhist artworks. Unique to Cambodia is the omnipresent krama (a unisex checked scarf usually made of cotton), while silk can be bought either by the length, or in the form of scarves and other garments. Prized locally since the 11th century, silver is today one of the most sought-after Cambodian souvenirs. Coming in the form of anklets, jewellery and other decorative items, it's known for being fashioned with real care and artistry. Jewellery, ceramics, clothing, CDs and DVDs are widespread in city markets (try Phnom Penh Central Market as a starting point) - go prepared to haggle.

It's not difficult to find vibrant nightlife in Cambodia, particularly in heavily visited destinations such as Phnom Penh and Siem Reap (which neighbours the Angkor Temple Complex).

Bars and restaurants are plentiful, ranging from down-and-dirty drinking holes to smart cocktail bars. Outright nightclubs are few and far between, although girlie bars are anything but rare - be sure to check a venue out before handing over a cover charge. Most major hotels offer entertainment of their own, with properties in Siem Reap especially good at hosting traditional dance performances during high season. Gambling is a major pastime in Cambodia and there are several casinos in Sihanoukville and on the border with Thailand. Classical Khmer dance displays have become popular inclusions on tourist itineraries, complete with ornate costumes and accompanying musicians. Many of these performances take place in the international hotels around Siem Reap, but villages may have their own spontaneous versions on special days. Water Festival, taking place in October or November, when the flow of the Tonle Sap River changes direction, is a chance to watch races between hundreds of rainbow-coloured boats, as well as to engage in three days of merry-making.

Phnom Penh might be overshadowed by the temples at Angkor but spend time in this Cambodian city and you’ll discover colonial buildings, wide boulevards, pagodas and riverside walks. Known for its extraordinary Royal Palace and the treasures contained in the National Museum, the best way to discover 21st century Phnom Penh is to explore on foot. Peruse the stalls in the bustling markets full of unusual smells and exotic items, observe monks collecting alms in the early morning hours and admire the dexterity of motorbike riders as they manoeuvre through the city’s chaotic traffic. If this all gets too much, retreat to one of Phnom Penh’s stylish restaurants, bars and shops which are testament to an emerging city full of confidence and one that is trying to put its troubled history behind it.

Royal Palace - Phnom Penh's showpiece attraction was built in the 1860s, and makes for a spectacular sight with its stupas, murals and towering spires. The adjoining Silver Pagoda houses a number of precious Buddha statues, while the tropical plants of the palace gardens have appeal in their own right.

Set in Phnom Penh, the National Museum is the country's leading archaeological and historical museum. It plays home to what is one of the world's most comprehensive collections of Khmer art, including bronzes, sculptures and ceramics. It was constructed by the French in 1917.

To get a clearer understanding of the brutal reign of Pol Pot, visit the Killing Fields outside Phnom Penh. It makes for a sobering experience, but a salutary one in terms of learning more about the realities the country faced. Set in the former high school that would later become the notorious S-21 detention centre, Tuol Sleng today acts as a museum of tribute to the genocide of the chilling Khmer Rouge era. Torture instruments remain in some rooms. This is an emotive experience.

A large park south of Phnom Penh given over to animals retrieved from poachers and traffickers. Wildlife in the sanctuary includes tigers, elephants and gibbons, and it offers an effective way of learning more about Cambodian fauna.

Travelling from Phnom Penh to Siem Reap by boat is the most scenic way of reaching the Angkor Temples from the capital, giving visitors a chance to take in the scenery and culture of Cambodia's life-giving waterways.

Hire a bike and spend a few days exploring the myriad glories of the jungled Angkor Temple Complex. The showpiece architecture of Angkor Wat makes it the best known of the temples, but there are dozens of others to discover. One of the most distinctive Angkor temples, Bayon is characterised by a series of colossal stone faces, gazing out serenely in all four directions, as well as some painstakingly detailed bas-reliefs. Bayon was built at a similar time to Angkor Wat.

Another option readily available at the Angkor Temples, do as Khmer royalty did centuries earlier by straddling an elephant for a memorable sunset journey. The activity is also offered in Rattanakiri and Mondulkiri.

Perhaps the second most famous Angkor Temple after Angkor Wat, Ta Prohm is best known for the roots and branches that have taken hold of its walls to picturesque effect. The temple featured as a location in the film Tomb Raider.

Sihanoukville - the port city's main draw is its relaxed beach atmosphere, a laid-back counterpoint to the more visited coastal areas of neighbouring Thailand. It takes its name from King Norodom Sihanouk, one of the main agitators for independence from France.

The southern town of Kampot provides a gateway to exploring the Cham villages and sweeping vistas of the surrounding countryside. If you're looking to travel in an unrushed fashion and to get acquainted with another side of the country, this is as good a base as any.

An abandoned French hill station in the south of the country, Bokor was built originally as a weekend sanctuary for settlers stuck in stifling Phnom Penh. Today, the hotel and casino complex stands as an eerily derelict reminder of days gone by.

Fire a rocket-launcher – not your standard tourist activity, but then Cambodia's not your standard tourist destination - for a price, visitors can take control of high-grade weaponry on countryside shooting ranges. Machine guns can also be hired.

The claim to fame of the Mekong town of Kratie is its population of Irrawaddy river dolphins. Various tour operators organise early-morning boat trips to observe these peaceful creatures in their natural habitat.Cambodia's coastline offers the chance for the archetypal Asian beach experience, but no amount of sea and sand is complete without sampling its ocean-fresh seafood. The stretch around Kampot and Kep is excellent for just-caught crab.

Taken from www.wortltravelguide.net

Doing business in CAMBODIA

In 2011 Cambodia's per capita income in PPP is $2,470 and $1,040 in nominal per capita. Cambodia's per capita income is rapidly increasing but is low compared to other countries in the region. Most rural households depend on agriculture and its related sub-sectors. Rice, fish, timber, garments and rubber are Cambodia's major exports. The International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) reintroduced more than 750 traditional rice varieties to Cambodia from its rice seed bank in the Philippines.[77] These varieties had been collected in the 1960s.

Based on the Economist, IMF: Annual average GDP growth for the period 2001–2010 was 7.7% making it one of the world's top ten countries with the highest annual average GDP growth. Tourism was Cambodia's fastest growing industry, with arrivals increasing from 219,000 in 1997 to over 2 million in 2007. In 2004, inflation was at 1.7% and exports at $1.6 billion US$.

Chinais Cambodia's biggest source of foreign direct investment. China planned to spend $8 billion in 360 projects in the first seven months of 2011. It is also the largest source of foreign aid, providing about $600 million in 2007 and $260 million in 2008.

The National Bank of Cambodia is the central bank of the kingdom and provides regulatory oversight to the country's banking sector and is responsible in part for increasing the foreign direct investment in the country. Between 2010 and 2012 the number of regulated banks and micro-finance institutions increased from 31 covered entities to over 70 individual institutions underlining the growth within the Cambodian banking and finance sector.

In 2012 Credit Bureau Cambodia was established with direct regulatory oversight by the National Bank of Cambodia.[78] The Credit Bureau further increases the transparency and stability within the Cambodian Banking Sector as all banks and micro-finance companies are now required by law to report accurate facts and figures relating to loan performance in the country.

One of the largest challenges facing Cambodia is still the fact that the older population often lacks education, particularly in the countryside, which suffers from a lack of basic infrastructure. Fear of renewed political instability and corruption within the government discourage foreign investment and delay foreign aid, although there has been significant aid from bilateral and multilateral donors. Donors pledged $504 million to the country in 2004,[79] while the Asian Development Bank alone has provided $850 million in loans, grants, and technical assistance.[80]

Tourism

The tourism industry is the country's second-greatest source of hard currency after the textile industry.[56] Between January and December 2007, visitor arrivals were 2.0 million, an increase of 18.5% over the same period in 2006. Most visitors (51%) arrived through Siem Reap with the remainder (49%) through Phnom Penh and other destinations.[81] Other tourist destinations include Sihanoukville in the south west which has several popular beach resorts and the area around Kampot and Kep including the Bokor Hill Station. Tourism has increased steadily each year in the relatively stable period since the 1993 UNTAC elections; in 1993 there were 118,183 international tourists, and in 2009 there were 2,161,577 international tourists.[82]

Taken from wikipedia

CAMBODIA: useful links

http://www.cambodia.org/

http://www.tourismcambodia.org/

http://www.pmtair.com/www/index.php

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/country_profiles/1243892.stm

Recommend Pearl Linguistics

We are pleased to now offer customers who provide us with a referral a range of incentives from discounts on future work through to champagne or spa days depending upon the work referred.







Separate emails with a comma, limited to 10.



 
Cancel

* a copy of this email will be sent to Pearl Linguistics
Subscribe to our newsletter and win prizes!

We compile a newsletter occasionally when we have significant news or information of interest to tell you. These could be anything from our company’s new services or achievements through to interesting information on the languages we work with as well as the related countries and cultures. You will also be the first one to know if we are running any discount campaigns.

Another reason to subscribe to the newsletter is that for each newsletter we hold a prize draw and randomly select a lucky subscriber to receive one of our great prizes such as

Pearl promises your information will never be shared with another party.

And you can easily unsubscribe at any time. Just enter your details below:





 
Cancel